Palestinians reject compromise peace deal

Sunday, December 09, 2007 |  by Staff Writer  

Israel and the international community pay lip service to the notion that the Middle East conflict can only be resolved through a compromise political settlement, but last week again ignored declarations by the Palestinians that they will no way compromise on their deadly demands.

The Palestinian Authority parliament on Thursday overwhelmingly approved the first reading of a bill that would make it illegal for the government of Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas to make concessions on Jerusalem in its peace negotiations with Israel. According to the pending legislation, any Palestinian official that agrees to leave Israel in control of any part of the half of Jerusalem that was occupied by Jordan from 1948-1967 will be guilty of high treason.

The Palestinians, including the US-backed "moderate" Abbas, insist they will not make peace with Israel unless the Jewish state surrenders all of the eastern half of Jerusalem, including several densely populated Jewish neighborhoods, the Old City and the Temple Mount.

In a speech delivered before Palestinian lawmakers on Thursday, Abbas said his government rejects the concept of a provisional Palestinian state envisioned by the first phase of the US-authored "road map" peace plan. The plan calls for the establishment of a sovereign Palestinian state within provisional borders in order to test the Palestinians' ability to effectively govern themselves and prevent elements within their society from attacking neighboring Israel.

Abbas went on to clarify for the parliament that he traveled to the US-hosted peace summit in Annapolis, Maryland last month not to negotiate a compromise peace agreement with Israel, but to make clear to the world the Palestinians' fixed, unalterable demands.

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