Israeli minister: Two-state solution is unrealistic

Monday, August 26, 2013 |  Israel Today Staff  

The two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that the world is touting, and that the Israeli leadership has publicly accepted, is unrealistic and will never happen, insisted a senior Israeli government minister.

"Those who are here understand why the vision of two states is unrealistic and will ever happen. Those who think they can force us to build only within the Auschwitz borders are wrong," said Housing Minister Uri Ariel (Jewish Home) on Sunday as he helped dedicate two new neighborhoods in the Samarian Jewish community of Kedumim.

The term "Auschwitz borders" was first used by former and legendary Israeli Foreign Minister Abba Eben in 1969, when he noted that the Arab states and the international community were trying to confine Israel to tiny, indefensible borders, much as how the Jews were corralled into ghettos during the Nazi Holocaust.

Ariel said Israel would continue building homes for Jews on all of the land promised to this nation in the Bible, as that is the only true Zionist response to the threats against the Jewish state.

Many Israelis, and many in the Israeli government have come to accept the notion that they must surrender Judea and Samaria (the so-called "West Bank") for the establishment of a Palestinian state in order to maintain a demographic Jewish majority in Israel.

But Knesset member Tzipi Hotoveli (Likud) told a gathering in Jerusalem on Sunday that Israel should not fear fully annexing those "disputed territories" and establishing a bi-national state.

Speaking at a conference advocating recognition of Jordan as the true Palestinian state, Hotoveli noted that annexing Judea and Samaria and granting Israeli citizenship to the 2.5 million Arabs living there would still mean a Jewish majority west of the Jordan river.

In fact, it would be a similar ratio of Jews to Arabs as what existed in the region when David Ben Gurion declared independence in 1948. Israel's first prime minister did not let himself be deterred by the fact that there were only 600,000 Jews to the 450,000 Arabs living in the area.

Just as in Ben Gurion's time, there remains a sufficient Jewish population around the world that will eventually immigrate to the Jewish state to further offset the increased Arab citizenry. And in the meantime, Israel will have solidly staked its claim to its historic and biblical heartland.

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