The Yom Kippur War - 42 years on...

Thursday, September 24, 2015 |  Israel Today Staff

Yesterday was Yom Kippur - the Jewish Day of Atonement. 42 years ago Yom Kippur fell on October 6th when Egypt and Syria, backed by other Arab states, attacked Israel by surprise from both the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights. The war lasted from 6 to 26 October 1973 resulting about 2,000 dead and 6,000 wounded Israelis.

The Yom Kippur war was probably the worst war that Israel experienced to date, leaving deep scars to this day - scars that may never heal completely.

Shimon, 75, said: "I was 33 years old and led my soldiers in battle on the Golan Heights. Two of my battalion commanders and seven soldiers fell beside me on the front. I was only thinking about my wife and three young children at home and asked our Lord fervently to sustain me and spare my life. God heard me.

For a long time after the war, I could not forget the images of the war. In Judaism, the body of a dead person must be completely buried. We were not allowed to leave even a torn limb of the dead on the battlefield. Even during the battle we had to collect every body part of the fallen. After a few days I couldn't tolerate the sight of my fallen comrades and body parts."

There is no Israeli family that has not experienced the ravages of war or terror. Israel was bleeding and it became harder for a mother to take leave of her children as they were recruited into the IDF, into the great unknown.

You, our honored friend of Israel, have the opportunity to support our children and grandchildren. Give a donation to a package of our soldiers and show your love and care. May our Lord bless you in this time. Amen!

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