Rare Toad Spotted After 25-year Absence, says Israel Nature and Parks Authority

Posted on 2/17/2013 by Miriam Cohen in Israel Israel Today Carmel Israel Nature and Parks Authority Syrian spadefoot Kibbutz Ga'ash Hula painted frog Hula Valley
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The Israel Nature and Parks Authority has announced the finding of a rare species of toad, the Syrian spadefoot, in a pool near Kibbutz Ga’ash on the coastal plain. This species, known to experts as Pelobates syriacus, has not been seen in the region for nearly 25 years and its return has been attributed to improved ecological conditions.

This is the second amphibian to return to Israel after a long absence. The discovery comes just a year after another rare species, the Hula painted frog, was spotted in the Hula Valley after missing for 50 years, and was feared to be extinct.

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