Biden is entirely detached from Israeli reality

70% of surveyed Israelis say the American president’s backing has decreased since the October 7 massacres.

By Ryan Jones | | Topics: Gaza, Biden
A billboard in Tel Aviv reminds Biden that a majority of Israelis elected Netanyahu and his government, and support their policies in making war on Hamas. Photo by Miriam Alster/FLASH90
A billboard in Tel Aviv reminds Biden that a majority of Israelis elected Netanyahu and his government, and support their policies in making war on Hamas. Photo by Miriam Alster/FLASH90

Israelis knew from the start that as unprecedented as the horrors of October 7, 2023 were, the world’s sympathy and support for the Jewish state would be short-lived. And they knew the United States would be no exception in that regard.

Predictably, as the war to eliminate the Hamas threat got underway in Gaza, and as the casualty toll began to mount, the White House’s initial unreserved support turned to chastisement, as though Israel were a child that needed to be instructed on how to properly deal with what had happened.

Days after Hamas hordes brutalized, raped and slaughtered over 1,000 Israeli men, women and children, US President Joe Biden declared that his administration would “not ever fail to have [Israel’s] back.”

What Biden meant, and what most Israelis knew he meant, is that Israel would have his full backing so long as Israel fought the Gaza war in a manner that didn’t upset American national interests.

Instead, Israel unleashed the full might of the IDF upon Hamas-ruled Gaza, determined that the coastal enclave-turned-terrorist haven never again possess the capability to pose an existential threat.

Unsurprisingly, Biden’s support has waned.

The Jewish People Policy Institute on Sunday published the results of a survey showing that over 70% of Israelis feel that US support for the Jewish state has declined in the months following what is now commonly known as “Black Shabbat.”

Today, Biden and his administration flip-flop between backing Israel’s right to “go after Hamas,” and decrying the IDF offensive in Gaza as “over the top.”

Israelis are also appalled by the White House’s determined push for a Palestinian state, at this of all times. Polls show that in the eyes of most Israelis, Oct. 7 finally proved that a sovereign Palestinian state would not only be a mistake from a security perspective, it would threaten the survival of the Jewish state.

Biden and US Vice President Kamala Harris, however, continue for some reason to think that the Israeli public thinks like them, and that the religious right-wing government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is an obstacle to Israelis doing what they know to be “the right thing,” ie. an immediate ceasefire in Gaza and steps toward establishing a Palestinian state.

Both Biden and Harris said as much in recent interviews and public appearances.

In an interview with Politico this week, Netanyahu said they are dead wrong. While he might not be the most popular man in Israel at the moment, Bibi stressed that the Israeli public remains overwhelmingly in favor or pressing the war forward until victory is achieved.

Leading Israeli political commentator Amit Segal told The Wall Street Journal that the Biden administration has a very faulty view of the Israeli public, which is in his estimation even more hawkish than the current government. No matter who’s prime minister, Segal suggested, he or she won’t end the war on terror or agree to the creation of an independent Palestinian state, because the Israeli public does not support those positions.

In the same article, foremost Israeli intellectual Micah Goodman posited that the Biden administration was projecting its own traumas from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan on Israel and Gaza. “We have a different perspective,” said Goodman, noting that Israel has in the past successfully used conventional military might to quell guerilla-style terrorist violence. “We have the determination and capacity to win,” he continued. “The only resource we don’t have is time, which depends on continued US support.”

It must also be noted that for Americans, the wars against Al Qaeda and its allies took place far away, on the other side of the world, not in their own backyard. In such a scenario, it’s easier to eventually become disinterested, or to begin worrying that the cost is not worth the hoped-for outcome.

For Israel, this is not the case. The war is happening here, and it is existential in nature. There is no second guessing among most Israelis over whether or not we are doing the right thing. Most Israelis know there is only one thing to be done: win.

Members

Israel Today Membership

Read all member content. Access exclusive, in-depth reports from Israel! Free Zoom events. Connect with Israel right from your home! Raise a voice of truth and hope. Support Faith-based journalism in Jerusalem!

Monthly
Membership

$5
/ month
Full access to Israel Today's Member-only content on all Digital Platforms.
Become a Member

Yearly
Membership

$46
/ year
Full access to Israel Today's Member-only content on all Digital Platforms.
Save 18% Per Month.
Become a Member

Six Months
Membership

$28
every 6 months
Full access to Israel Today's Member-only content on all Digital Platforms.
Save 9% Per Month.
Become a Member

Leave a Reply

Israel Today Newsletter

Daily news

FREE to your inbox

Israel Heute Newsletter

Tägliche Nachrichten

KOSTENLOS in Ihrer Inbox

Subscribe to our Daily Newsletter